SimplyClever.Cards Arithmetic Board Game Review

Game: Simply Clever Cards Arithmetic (2014)
Publisher: Simplicatus Research and Development
Designer: Vegard Stornes Farstad

Players: 1-6
Duration: 5-20 minutes
Age: 7+
Time to Learn: 5-10 minutes

SimplyClever.Cards Arithmetic Review

Simply Clever 3.JPG

Description

SimplyClever.Cards Arithmetic is a compact card game that teaches math and tests your brainpower, while still remaining fully functional as a regular old deck of cards. 

Gameplay

The game consists of a simple deck of 52 cards and four jokers. Each of the jokers (in upcoming version 2.0) has a mathematical operation symbol, +, -, * and =, on it so you can make your own calculations. The cards have a large number, 0 through 12, on the top portion of the card. The bottom portion of the card has a list of five numbers that are the products, from 0 to 144, of the top numbers.

The list of possibilities is endless with this game. The cards are designed like a regular set of cards, so you can play any regular card game you know, with the great addition of mathematics. You can try your hand at Crazy Eights, Go Fish, Memory, Slap Jack, Uno etc…

Example play: 3 on the top portion, 5 on the top portion, 8 on the bottom portion. 3 + 5 = 8

Note: We're told that a version 2.0 is coming soon that will have operators on the jokers, so no need to imagine them for yourself or write them on pieces of paper.

Verdict

While this game is not something that will regularly come to my gaming table, it is something I will regularly use to help my child practice her math facts. She has loved challenging her friends to a math fact memory duel. Being a teacher, I’m also excited to share this game with my fellow colleagues to use in their classroom. Nothing is more motivating than having fun while learning and this game is definitely going to bring the fun to the classroom.

Pros

  • Small and portable
  • Easy to learn
  • Simple, non-distracting, easy to read cards
  • Fits all four operations, addition, subtraction, multiplication and division
  • Endless game possibilities

Cons

  • Previous understanding of games is critical

 

Board Game Review by Professor Annamous